Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Whats Your Thoughts On Late Starters ?


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 fixitsan

fixitsan

    Carpe Citizen

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,675 posts
  • Location:West Lothian
  • TDM model: 2003

Posted 22 January 2016 - 09:55 am

I moved away from Leeds 25 years ago, but loosely kept in touch with my best mate from that time, the past couple of years we've chatted on Skype and Facebook, not that it adds anything to my question !

 

He announced to me this week that he's going to do his CBT and get a 125. while chatting about it I mentioned the cost of bikes, that he will pay a grand or more for the sort of modern(ish) 125 he would like, but that he could get something like the venerable XJ600 for less. Then he said that the cost to do Direct Access at this particular Bradford based school was £595 (excl CBT) and he reckons he may as well because of the almost negligible price difference between the two plans

 

He's 47 years old has been banned a couple of times in the past in cars, but after having cancer twice in recent years I have to say he probably has changed his ways and outlook to life. His course is booked for the second week in Feb (wet and windy !) 

 

It's going to be great to meet up somewhere between Leeds and here and go riding together, but something inside me is bothered about him starting late, particularly after seeing the latest accident stats broken down into age group. I'ld recommend he does BikeSafe and at least joins a group with experienced riders till he's confident. At the end of the day it's none of my business and he's his own man, but just wondering of there are any late starters here who could offer some reassurance.


Edited by fixitsan, 22 January 2016 - 10:01 am.

9'er with a 17" front wheel and Samios remap  :)  happy days


#2 ChrisG

ChrisG

    Resident vulture

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,049 posts
  • Location:Netherlands
  • TDM model: 2009

Posted 22 January 2016 - 10:24 am

If he's looking at getting a 125 or an older XJ600 he's probably not in the big accident statistic category, that tends to be people who do direct access and buy a litre sports bike.  Sounds like he's planning on start on a budget, which is pretty much what those who start young tend to do, but he's probably not got the feeling or immortality that most 18 year olds have.

 

Bikesafe or similar is a good idea, but need to be careful with groups, an inexperienced rider can easily be tempted to try and keep up with someone quicker than themselves, which is an accident waiting to happen.

 

My Mrs learned in her mid 30's and decided to spend a while on a 125 to get her confidence up before doing direct access and getting an XJ600.  Interestingly I feel it's improved her driving as she's a lot more aware of what's going on around her, but years of car driving has give her a starting level of experience and road sense that many younger riders might lack.


1992 Mk1, 76k miles, Hagon springs, MTC exhaust, 4½ gears Gone now :(
2009 900 abs, 42k miles, Yamaha heated grips, double bubble screen, R&G crash bungs, scottoiler, Autocom, 1500 lumen LED spotlights.

post-1-1152402501.jpgeyesbloodshot.gifpost-1-1150550726.gifflame.gifpost-1-1150559830.gifautocom-logo-small.gif

#3 Studley Ramrod

Studley Ramrod

    Monkey Boys Monkey

  • Root Admin(A)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,505 posts
  • Location:HELLO ! I'm in the Library...Notts
  • TDM model: 1993

Posted 22 January 2016 - 10:33 am

Late starter here.  Just be sure to buy a bike that won't test your experience too much.  I did my DA on a CB500, a KLE500 and then got a mk1 8fiddly, after failing my test a few times, which I passed with. 

Time in the saddle is what I was lacking and I wish I'd got a 125 and zoomed around on that for a few weeks instead of paying £500 to go on a 1 week course.  The course was crap, middle of Feb and only getting about 3 hours a day out on the road 'cos the instructor was a lazy tw*t who liked bacon sarnys....a lot !

Jumping on an R1 straight after doing your test 'aint advisable, as the stats will prolly show.


Mk2a 2000 in Silver. Top end Refurb @ 41100 miles, Scottoiler, Renthal Road High Bars, Up & Back Bar Risers, Bellypan, DL650 Handguards, Capt. Picard Bar Ends, House of Henty SS Wheel spacers, New Seat Cover Fitted. 58 MPG !!  Now owned by chrisbee !   Studley's mk2a Bloggerydoodaah !  Photos of my first MK1  Photos of my MK2a  TPLQHCSRSFC No. 1 Fan


#4 fixitsan

fixitsan

    Carpe Citizen

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,675 posts
  • Location:West Lothian
  • TDM model: 2003

Posted 22 January 2016 - 10:36 am

Thanks for that Chris. I agree with car experience being helpful, particularly in learning to predict what could happen next up ahead.

 

I went straight onto a xj600 (pre diversion) at 24, I could have done worse, but I wish i had taken some advanced tuition too. Had been driving cars since 17 and at that time I was driving 40,000 miles a year. I see the sense in riding smaller bikes for a period, he has also talked about 250-400 class bikes too so that's what he might do.

 

I've advised he spends as much as possible on good gear. The feedback from the riding school is 'lets see how you do on the first day with the CBT and then we'll advise you if you should get experience first before going on'....... so they're considering his options by the sounds of it

 

I was just thinking that I'm 47 and with lots of experience, but without it how would I cope with the training ? But then again it's your attitude which is more important, the risks are likely to even themselves out if you have a good attitude


9'er with a 17" front wheel and Samios remap  :)  happy days


#5 fixitsan

fixitsan

    Carpe Citizen

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,675 posts
  • Location:West Lothian
  • TDM model: 2003

Posted 22 January 2016 - 10:45 am

Late starter here.  Just be sure to buy a bike that won't test your experience too much.  I did my DA on a CB500, a KLE500 and then got a mk1 8fiddly, after failing my test a few times, which I passed with. 

Time in the saddle is what I was lacking and I wish I'd got a 125 and zoomed around on that for a few weeks instead of paying £500 to go on a 1 week course.  The course was crap, middle of Feb and only getting about 3 hours a day out on the road 'cos the instructor was a lazy tw*t who liked bacon sarnys....a lot !

Jumping on an R1 straight after doing your test 'aint advisable, as the stats will prolly show.

 

 

I take your point about experience, Studs. He originally said he just wanted a 125 to go and visit his parents on and do a bit of shopping, but knowing him like I do he'll just love being out and about on it, so i told him what he starts out thinking he will do, and what he ends up doing, be be two different things ! I remember passing the test and then doing the shopping after work, finding supermarkets that were about an hour away, despite already living 300 yards from one :)

 

 

I also said that if he did want to stick on a 125 i would buy one too ( My daughter is thinking of doing a CBT so would need a 125 here anyway) and I sent him this vid.......I reckon it would give anyone a great time on a trip to Europe

 


9'er with a 17" front wheel and Samios remap  :)  happy days


#6 ChrisG

ChrisG

    Resident vulture

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,049 posts
  • Location:Netherlands
  • TDM model: 2009

Posted 22 January 2016 - 11:02 am

I also said that if he did want to stick on a 125 i would buy one too ( My daughter is thinking of doing a CBT so would need a 125 here anyway) and I sent him this vid.......I reckon it would give anyone a great time on a trip to Europe

 

If I had an excuse to get a 125 I'd be scouring the classified for a TDR :wub:


Edited by ChrisG, 22 January 2016 - 11:03 am.

1992 Mk1, 76k miles, Hagon springs, MTC exhaust, 4½ gears Gone now :(
2009 900 abs, 42k miles, Yamaha heated grips, double bubble screen, R&G crash bungs, scottoiler, Autocom, 1500 lumen LED spotlights.

post-1-1152402501.jpgeyesbloodshot.gifpost-1-1150550726.gifflame.gifpost-1-1150559830.gifautocom-logo-small.gif

#7 fixitsan

fixitsan

    Carpe Citizen

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,675 posts
  • Location:West Lothian
  • TDM model: 2003

Posted 22 January 2016 - 11:37 am

 

If I had an excuse to get a 125 I'd be scouring the classified for a TDR :wub:

 

The baby TDM :)

 

Considering there's so little power I'l probably get the one with the smallest frontal area, but then I'm likely to spoil that idea with my own frontal area !


9'er with a 17" front wheel and Samios remap  :)  happy days


#8 AliG

AliG

    has been here 4ever

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,285 posts
  • Location:Melrose, Scottish Borders
  • TDM model: 2010

Posted 22 January 2016 - 01:56 pm

When I came back to biking, I bought a Hyosung 125cc for very little money and used it to commute on to get some practice. I got back almost what I paid for it when I sold it and bought a Divvy 600. The Divvy is definitely a forgiving bike for an inexperienced rider. I got my money back on that too when I bought my first niner.

I then did Bikesafe and then joined IAM.

Ali


Edited by AliG, 22 January 2016 - 01:57 pm.

2004 900 - Blue with lots of goodies

2012 900 - Black. Still adding shiny bits


#9 muddy

muddy

    full o shoite

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,969 posts
  • Location:North West
  • TDM model: no more

Posted 22 January 2016 - 02:06 pm

A sensible 650, like a Versys or VStrom is a good choice and safer than any 125.  Good road presence, stability and being able to accelerate quickly out of trouble are important for road safety, so the bigger bike is king.


Blue 04 TDM,PR2 rear Roadsmart front, Yamaha topox, Givi E360 panniers, PL pannier holders, BMW handguards, Yamaha touring screen, Scottoiler, 12v ciggie socket, carbon core HT leads

 

Gorn :sorry:


#10 Robodene

Robodene

    has been here 4ever

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,360 posts
  • Location:Mid Bucks
  • TDM model: no more

Posted 22 January 2016 - 04:47 pm

I was a late re-starter (after 50 years, though not quite the same thing, of course). I had a 250 for that and I see nothing wrong with a 125. It nicely restricts what you can do. The time will come for something bigger eventually, though. My hope would be that he intends to keep learning until he finally stops. Where possible, take time for riding decisions and rush nothing. And avoid group riding, I'd say; to me, getting on the end of one of those must be like being at the end of a whip cord. I hope he will enjoy many happy hours riding, like the rest of us.
1940s Ariel 350 (ex-military) Khaki > Black & White '56' Kymco Venox 250 Metallic Grey '56' TDM 900/A (ABS) Silver[b] '56' Yamaha MT-03 White <p>[b] '14' Yamaha MT-07 Matt Grey[b] '17' Honda Rebel 500 

#11 ProudViking

ProudViking

    needs a 2nd hobby

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 780 posts
  • Location:Market Harborough, England
  • TDM model: 2010

Posted 22 January 2016 - 05:11 pm

A near death experience got me back on a bike. Trust me, There's only ever one time its too late to start anything. I hope he enjoys every second on a bike, Doesn't really matter whether its a 125 or a 1000, The smile is always the same. :)  :)  :)



#12 ric

ric

    Carpe fan

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 175 posts
  • TDM model: 2006

Posted 22 January 2016 - 06:26 pm

Can't comment on being a late starter because I was riding at 13 and on the road on my 16th birthday.  But I did have a longish break during which I hardly rode at all.  At restart I got a virago 535 but quickly upped to a 750 Honda.

 

If he's got the yearning go for it.  As long as the bike is manageable I don't think engine size comes into it, more that he can be in control, except I would prefer enough power to get out of trouble as well as in to it.

 

Perhaps do a bit of off road first, not necessarily off offroading per se but on some waste land or a similar, to get a feel for it.  And then get taught the necessary roadcraft.

 

Just my two penny'worth and given I couldn't see danger and piled it big time before I was 17, take it as you will.

 

Hope he gets going and enjoys every minute.



#13 fixitsan

fixitsan

    Carpe Citizen

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,675 posts
  • Location:West Lothian
  • TDM model: 2003

Posted 22 January 2016 - 07:40 pm

I appreciate these comments :)

 

He hasn't expressed any interest in 'going fast', just wants some cost effective practical fun transport. His instructor will hopefully advise him appropriately, based on his assessment of my mates skill level


9'er with a 17" front wheel and Samios remap  :)  happy days


#14 harvey krumpet

harvey krumpet

    has been here 4ever

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,927 posts
  • Location:New Zealand
  • TDM model: 1997

Posted 22 January 2016 - 09:06 pm

My G/F did not learn to ride until she was 50. She considered herself to be a "good" car driver based on getting her license through the German system which is quite thorough. Learning road craft and how to handle a bike was a revelation for her.

Speaking only from my experience, focusing on slow speed bike handling skills and road craft with the aim of being safe is paramount. Road craft helps to avoid getting in the crap and handling skills help getting out of the crap if a situation happens.

Our philosophy was training, practice, practice, practice. Repeat.

I was quite concerned exposing my G/F to the risks of riding but she has developed great skills and awareness. She is quick, safe and loves every second of it.

Hopefully your mate sets out to be a good rider first and foremost.

 

Lots of free advice out there from people who have been riding forever but never advanced their training. Can be a bit of a mine field for a n00b, it's easy to get taken for a ride with people who will demonstrate exactly how not to ride.


TDM 850 Loud and unusual. CRM 250r Woo hoo! DT 230 Lanza Fiddled with.... Bloody hell, is that legal? GG Randonee AKA "I didn't think that was possible".


#15 steve27bha

steve27bha

    Knight of Postsalot

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 552 posts
  • Location:West Lothian
  • TDM model: 2008

Posted 23 January 2016 - 05:07 pm

.....

I've advised he spends as much as possible on good gear. ....

 

I suggest he buys second-hand via eBay - except for the helmet of course. You can get really good stuff in good condition for a fraction of the retail price. I've hardly ever paid full whack for anything and I have two full sets of leathers and another two of textiles, three pairs of boots, etc.. ( - and I'm not even a Scot!)

 

Hein Gericke stuff is dependable, but it helps to know their range and catalogues since sellers rarely quote the model name or details.


TDM900A 2008/09 in use, with     gallery_179098_391_770.jpg sml_gallery_179098_391_1145.jpg  gallery_179098_391_1206.jpg gallery_179098_391_253.jpg gallery_179098_391_82.jpg gallery_179098_391_725.gif gallery_179098_391_797.jpg gallery_179098_391_1396.jpg gallery_179098_391_501.jpg gallery_179098_391_316.jpg  gallery_179098_391_1768.jpg gallery_179098_391_106.jpggallery_179098_391_2170.jpg gallery_179098_391_1373.jpg

 

CBX750FE in reserve; Cagiva N90 125 in bits


#16 divvxj

divvxj

    has been here 4ever

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,293 posts
  • Location:back in the garden
  • TDM model: 2007

Posted 23 January 2016 - 05:31 pm

A sensible 650, like a Versys or VStrom is a good choice and safer than any 125.  Good road presence, stability and being able to accelerate quickly out of trouble are important for road safety, so the bigger bike is king.

 

aye , maybe, but if you are inexperienced you might be accelerating into trouble , just a thought



#17 TYREDNGRUMPEE

TYREDNGRUMPEE

    has been here 4ever

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,627 posts
  • TDM model: 1998

Posted 23 January 2016 - 06:50 pm

A sensible 650, like a Versys or VStrom is a good choice and safer than any 125.  Good road presence, stability and being able to accelerate quickly out of trouble are important for road safety, so the bigger bike is king.

 

Agreed.

 

 

aye , maybe, but if you are inexperienced you might be accelerating into trouble , just a thought

 

 

Can't think of anything more incongruous than a mature rider being made to ride a 125. Bloody dangerous for everyone.

If young scrotes survive, then fine, release them into the wild.

There is value in what muddy says.



#18 divvxj

divvxj

    has been here 4ever

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,293 posts
  • Location:back in the garden
  • TDM model: 2007

Posted 23 January 2016 - 07:40 pm

puch maxi , then onto a zzr 600



#19 NickIAM

NickIAM

    Knight of Postsalot

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 502 posts
  • Location:Chichester, West Sussex
  • TDM model: 2009

Posted 23 January 2016 - 10:28 pm

I started riding at almost 40. Being older (and more cautious) got a 250 as first bike. For me I wanted the first bike to be:

- Not too expensive
- Easy to ride
- Low enough to touch ground with both feet flat
- Light enough to push, catch and pick up easily
- Not enough power to let me be stupid whilst learning

Got a hyosung aquila 250.

Wrote it off in first year, misjudged a blind left-hander and scraped along the side of a car coming the other way. Could have been really nasty. Then got TDM and set sights on advanced training.

But others have gone for a litre sports bike as first bike and been fine. :)

:)

Yeah, I've done the IAM. And yeah, I recommend it (any so-called 'advanced training' come to that; not just IAM): A low cost training course based on the system used by the police, which is largely common sense once pointed out, making one smoother, quicker and safer. What's not to like? And why would one not want to tell others?  :hide:


#20 fixitsan

fixitsan

    Carpe Citizen

  • Supporting Member(thanks)
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,675 posts
  • Location:West Lothian
  • TDM model: 2003

Posted 23 January 2016 - 11:36 pm

puch maxi , then onto a zzr 600

 

I was looking at ZZR600's...... they're a popular bike and reliable. I can't see him going for anything remotely sporty looking....but then again I never thought he'd get up and do the CBT !

 

Got to let him look around and see how he likes to ride I suppose


I started riding at almost 40. Being older (and more cautious) got a 250 as first bike. For me I wanted the first bike to be:

- Not too expensive
- Easy to ride
- Low enough to touch ground with both feet flat
- Light enough to push, catch and pick up easily
- Not enough power to let me be stupid whilst learning

Got a hyosung aquila 250.

Wrote it off in first year, misjudged a blind left-hander and scraped along the side of a car coming the other way. Could have been really nasty. Then got TDM and set sights on advanced training.

But others have gone for a litre sports bike as first bike and been fine. :)

 

 

I think something 250-400 would be best but like you say, it's surprising what some people do and never have a problem


9'er with a 17" front wheel and Samios remap  :)  happy days



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users